Entomology Problem, English Walnut Trees

Asked January 11, 2021, 1:33 PM EST

This is the second time I have requested assistance with this problem and received no acknowledgement or help. I realize that the COV
COVID-19 problem has created issues, but no answer is over a month?
I have a couple of English Walnut trees the younger of which last summer began to turn chlorotic and drop leaves. I noticed bore holes in the trunk and believe that the tree was under attack from an insect. I would like to treat the tree with a systemic and if possible, not spray. Answers?

Baker County Oregon

2 Responses

Hi,

Thanks for reaching out. I am sorry to hear that you didn't receive our previous response.

Our records show this reply on 12.4.20:
"If you could forward a couple of photos of the boring damage to the trunk and limbs that would help greatly in determining what the cause might be. In general, boring insects are problematic for control by insecticides as they are protected from most applications inside the tree. Often there are few, or no, insecticides registered for control of these types of insects, even for commercial use, depending on the nut tree in question. The active ingredient in Lorsban, chlorpyrifos, is an organophosphate insecticide that is not registered for use in a home garden nut orchard. If you can forward a couple of photos of the damage it might be possible to identify the cause of the damage and we can go from there. Either a response to AAE, or directly to my email (below) would work. I'm happy to help and look forward to hearing from you!

Neil Bell
Community Horticulturist
Oregon State University Extension Service http://extension.oregonstate.edu
neil.bell@oregonstate.edu"

I see that your latest message includes a photo. I will pass this along to Neil Bell for further response. If you didn't see the message I copied above, please do check your spam folders since responses sent through our system sometimes end up there. Again, so sorry for the communication challenges and thank you for reaching out.


Sometimes replies end up in junk mail, here was your prompt reply:

If you could forward a couple of photos of the boring damage to the trunk and limbs that would help greatly in determining what the cause might be. In general, boring insects are problematic for control by insecticides as they are protected from most applications inside the tree. Often there are few, or no, insecticides registered for control of these types of insects, even for commercial use, depending on the nut tree in question. The active ingredient in Lorsban, chlorpyrifos, is an organophosphate insecticide that is not registered for use in a home garden nut orchard. If you can forward a couple of photos of the damage it might be possible to identify the cause of the damage and we can go from there. Either a response to AAE, or directly to my email (below) would work. I'm happy to help and look forward to hearing from you!

Neil Bell
Community Horticulturist
Oregon State University Extension Service http://extension.oregonstate.edu
neil.bell@oregonstate.edu