Maple tree issue

Asked July 5, 2020, 11:05 AM EDT

Leaves are spotting or drying up on this newly planted maple. Treatment ideas?

Sussex County Delaware

4 Responses

Hi! Thank you for your question. My guess is transplant shock and possible insect feeding. Could you send me a few more photos? - 1)overall photo of the tree in the landscape - to see where it is planted and located in the landscape 2) A closer photo of the tree itself - to show overall health and areas affected 3) a close up photo that might include a limb and the leaves on that area. Date of planting and if it is irrigated. If so, hand watering, drip irrigation and how often.
I look forward to seeing the other information to help make a decision.
Best regards,
Tracy

Hi Tracy,


The tree was planted on June 25th. When it was planted, I watered it in. The lawn where it was planted gets about an inch of water per week from my irrigation system. I watered the tree with a hose for about five minutes the other day. That area is on a very slight slope. The landscaper raised the tree up a little bit and put rocks in the soil to help with irrigation because that area holds water somewhat.

Attached are a few more photos.

Hi Tracy,

Here are a view more pictures.

Thanks,
Barry

Barry,
Hi. Thank you for the additional photos. They are helpful in trying to make a recommendation. Overall the tree looks healthy since it was planted in June 2020. There is some scorching of the leaves, this can be one symptom of transplant shock or it could be wind damage.
If your irrigation system wets the area once a week with one inch of water, this may be enough, but it depends on how moist it is in the area of the root ball? how far down does the moisture go? It is worse to have a small amount of water multiple times a week, you need to apply water that will soak the rootball.

Tree owner’s manual - https://www.fs.usda.gov/Internet/FSE_DOCUMENTS/fsbdev7_013722.pdf

Drought in the landscape - https://www.udel.edu/content/dam/udelImages/canr/pdfs/extension/environmental-stewardship/DroughtBrochure.pdf

https://www.purdue.edu/hla/sites/yardandgarden/watering-the-garden-just-right/

There is some insect feeding - looks like possible Japanese beetle. https://extension.entm.purdue.edu/publications/E-75/E-75.html

The other recommendation is to pull the mulch away from the trunk, about an inch so it doesn't touch the trunk and stay moist continuously - causing bark decay. Remember to remove the staking about about 1-1.5 years from now. Staking that stays on too long can impede trunk growth.

Best regards, Tracy