I have a weeping cherry tree, last week it was looking good, then last week...

Asked June 15, 2020, 9:53 AM EDT

I have a weeping cherry tree, last week it was looking good, then last week we had high winds and rain. that next day my leaves on my weeping cherry tree were curled up and very dry. They just crumple in your hands. You would think that a chemical was sprayed on them, but they were not. Do you think the tree is dying or do you think it will be okay

Franklin County Ohio

1 Response

Thanks for your question using Ask a Master Gardener.

Without a photo of the tree, I would be completely guessing as to the cause of the damage done to the tree and if the tree will recover.

It is possible that the combination of the high temperatures and then the severe storm may have compromised the tree. If the tree was broken at the soil line (the stem damaged between the top and the roots), the leaves would not be able to remain viable. That could have happened with the intense wind event.

I am also reminded that last year and then again this winter, we had very wet conditions with a dry almost drought condition sandwiched in-between last summer. That can lead to root damage which then cause a sudden collapse of the leaf top when the stress become intense as in our conditions recently. The tree would have had enough stored energy to push out new leaves, but then again, not able to maintain them. We also had a freeze condition on May 9 which damaged lots of leaves that now become obviously damaged.

As I stated at the beginning, these are just guesses of what could have happened. If the tree is valuable to you, you can do two things. One is wait and see if the tree drops the damaged leaves and sends out a new set, and the second is to hire an arborist to take a look at the tree.
You can find a certified arborist by using the link below:

https://www.treesaregood.org/findanarborist/findanarborist

I wish you success, trees are a hard thing to lose. You may send in a photo and we can see it there is anything obvious for us to look at, but the on-site evaluation by an arborist would be the best bet.
Thanks for your question.