determinate or indeterminate

Asked April 13, 2020, 3:16 PM EDT

I recently purchased some tomato plants for a home garden a Rutgers and a Medford. My question is what type is each one?

Benton County Oregon

5 Responses

Indeterminate tomatoes tend to ripen fruits over an extended time period whereas determinate tomatoes tend to ripen their fruits within a short period, usually 1 to 2 weeks. Indeterminate tomato plants tend to grow until cold weather stops them; they may as tall as 6 feet or more. See https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/tomato/determinate-vs-indeterminate.htm.

Here, in the Pacific Northwest, I've found that both kinds of tomato plants benefit from a sturdy support.

Rutgers is listed as a sturdy determinate grower that tends to grow about 5 feet tall. See https://bonnieplants.com/product/rutgers-tomato/.






I recently purchased a Brandywine and a Mortgage Lifter in a small pot. When would you transfer them to the garden? They are currently about 4" tall.Thanks.

The OSU publication "Grow Your Own Tomatoes and Tomatillos" suggests "Plant as soon as the soil is in good, workable condition and danger from frost is past. This will be May 1 to 10 in most western Oregon areas. In central Oregon, although there is no true frost date, we recommend planting in the second week of June and having frost protection in place.

You might also like to read "Growing Your Own," a tabloid with an overview of growing vegetables. It has a useful planting chart on page 7 .- https://catalog.extension.oregonstate.edu/sites/catalog/files/project/pdf/em9027.pdf


Your article on "Grow Your Own Tomatoes and Tomatillos" was a great help. I am hoping you have something similar on planting cucumbers. Thanks a lot.

Cucumbers are easy. Seed directly into a sunny spot in the garden when the soil is at least 55F. When you thin the seedlings, cut off the excess at ground level.

Here are several resources!
- Wait for the soil to warm up to plant cukes - https://extension.oregonstate.edu/news/wait-soil-warm-plant-cukes

Enjoy your garden!