anacyclus depresses

Asked February 18, 2020, 12:53 PM EST

Is mount atlas daisy the same variety as silverkissen aka silver-kisses when ordering seeds, mount atlas daisy is the variety but often they are listed as mount atlas daisy silverkissen. If I am growing them from seeds, how many seeds should I place in a container as I want to grow them and then transfer them between my pavers?

Calvert County Maryland

4 Responses

We have come across the Mount Atlas Daisy (Anacyclus depressus) cultivar name 'Silberkissen' translated both as 'Silver Kisses' and 'Silver Cushion' by various growers. In either case, growers listing either the species or this cultivar do not distinguish any differences between the two, so presumably there is no major distinction to set them apart. Instructions should be provided on the seed packet (or from the seed vendor, if ordering online) as to spacing between seeds; we cannot find specific information regarding sowing except that they should be surface-sown. Since it is a self-seeding plant, it should fill in any gaps in subsequent years. If you are using small-celled seed-starting plug trays, you could try as few as one or two seeds per plug, or a few more and thin-out any weaker seedlings so one is left per plug, as is commonly done with vegetable and herb seed-starting.

Miri

So, silverkissen aka silverkiss is a cultivar of mount atlas daisy aka Anacyclus depressus? I thought that silverkissen and mount atlas daisy may be distinct as cultivars of Anacyclus depressus . I do not have the encyclopedia to check that. I have purchased mount daisy twice in the past. They were short lived but beautiful bec when they are semi open as in a cloudy day, I would see the distinct red backside. But pictures of silverkissen does not seem as pretty.

So, silverkissen aka silverkiss is a cultivar of mount atlas daisy aka Anacyclus depressus? I thought that silverkissen and mount atlas daisy may be distinct as cultivars of Anacyclus depressus . I do not have the encyclopedia to check that. I have purchased mount daisy twice in the past. They were short lived but beautiful bec when they are semi open as in a cloudy day, I would see the distinct red backside. But pictures of silverkissen does not seem as pretty.

Listings by perennial growers indicate that it is a cultivar, yes, but details of its distinctiveness seem lacking. It is also not unheard of for some growers in the horticulture industry to list a common name as if it were a cultivar name, which admittedly adds to the confusion. Cultivars are typically propagated vegetatively (cuttings or division) rather than by seed, but there are exceptions. We suggest that if you had a form you preferred from years past, look for seed labelled with the same name, just in case there is a difference between the two. You can also ask the vendor that is offering the seed you are considering if they know how 'Silberkissen' differs from the straight species and why they prefer to offer that selection instead.

Mount Atlas Daisy is by nature a short-lived plant, and its preference for alpine habitats makes it a poor match for our area's climate and soils. Thus, the potential for the plants to live their longest is at odds with our warm weather (especially overnight temperatures in summer, which alpine habitats do not experience) and clay-based soils that retain more water than alpine soils, which tend to be grittier. If these new plants self-sow next year, the locations where they grow may show you where the conditions are best suited to them.

Miri