Asian Jumping Worms

Asked October 11, 2019, 10:53 AM EDT

I don't have time to look thru all 76 pages of "Invasive Species" on your site. Please forward any information you have on Asian Jumping Worms, also known as Asian Crazy Worms. I have them in my 2 compost piles and of course the eggs that will hatch next spring. I'm worrying about them moving to my woods. What can you suggest? Would burying the compost under ground and covering with sand prevent eggs from hatching?

Berrien County Michigan gardening compost landscaping soil and fertility issues

1 Response

Hello,

I don’t know if burying them that deep would kill them, and I found no research about that method.

Here are the control options according to various Extension Services-

-Live worms can be bagged and left out in the sun for at least 10 minutes. Then throw bag away.

Proper disposal methods include solarizing them or soaking them in alcohol.

-Presently there are no pesticides registered for use against earthworms. There are also no proven biological control measures. Researchers in Kentucky have trialed an organic fertilizer called Early Bird (Ocean Organics, Waldboro, ME) on golf courses and the product seemed to also affect some earthworms species. It is marketed as a natural organic fertilizer, containing 3% nitrogen, and 1% soluble potash, is derived from oil seed meal, kelp extract and composted poultry litter. But it also has low concentrations of tea seed tree saponins (http://www.usga.org/news/2011/October/Course-Care--Controlling-Earthworm-Casts/). Little is known about the effect of these saponins on earthworms when applied in high concentration. Remember that these amendments are not approved against earthworm and that Tea Seed Tree saponins also affect fish if it reaches water bodies in high concentrations.

-Wisconsin researchers this year found hot temperatures of 100degrees Fahrenheit killed cocoons.

https://news.wisc.edu/heat-kills-invasive-jumping-worm-cocoons-could-help-limit-spread/

If you haven’t yet reported your location, you may do so here-

https://www.misin.msu.edu/report/misin/?project=misin&habit=Worm

As you probably know, research is ongoing and you may continue to check these websites for updates on the latest control methods::

https://s3.amazonaws.com/assets.cce.cornell.edu/attachments/26324/Species_Spotlight_Snakeworm_508_092017.pdf?1508346313

https://extension.psu.edu/look-out-for-jumping-earthworms

Thank you for being concerned about invasive species, and for using our service.