Is this Round-Up hoopla true or not?? I have been applying it in many ways...

Asked August 16, 2019, 5:02 PM EDT

Is this Round-Up hoopla true or not?? I have been applying it in many ways for as long as it has been available. At age 80, I think this is a Lefty hoax. I wanted to ask Prof Street but do not have his numbr

Logan County Ohio herbicides

2 Responses

Dear Sir / Madam:

Most pesticide regulatory agencies throughout the world agree that glyphosate is not likely to be a public health risk. Glyphosate is a registered pesticide in the United States and is legal to use. The US EPA has the authority to register pesticides in the U.S.. On April 30, 2019 the EPA reaffirmed that there are no risks to public health from this active ingredient when used in accordance with the pesticide label. The 2017 ecological risk assessment did identify some ecological risks, so EPA is proposing some appropriate management measures. You can read more about the EPA's recent decision at https://www.epa.gov/newsreleases/epa-takes-next-step-review-process-herbicide-glyphosate-reaffirms-no-risk-public-health. In August, the EPA reaffirmed again "no risks to public health when glyphosate is used in accordance with its current label." here https://www.epa.gov/newsreleases/epa-takes-action-provide-accurate-risk-information-consumers-stop-false-labeling


Many people are concerned because glyphosate was identified as a probable carcinogen by the International Agency for research on cancer (IARC) a few years back. Just to provide some perspective, IARC has also identified alcoholic beverages and red meat as carcinogens. IARCs job is to identify substances that may cause cancer, but does not consider the likelihood at real-world exposure levels.

The EPA's job is different from IARC's. EPA assesses risk, which must take in account the exposure level in addition to the hazard. EPA does not consider glyphosate a risk to public health because it it is not likely to be a human cancer agent at real world exposure levels. It helps to think of an over-the counter pain reliever. Take one, good. Take the whole bottle, bad. Hope the analogy helps you better understand the nature of risk, because the same principle applies to glyphosate and many other pesticides.

Thanks for the professional answer to my question about Round-Up!! It was topnotch!!


Jim Frobase, entomologist