this doesn't make sense

Asked June 28, 2019, 1:56 PM EDT

When canning without sugar, use high quality fruit. Overripe fruit will soften excessively. Take special care to follow steps that prevent darkening of light-colored fruit. Several treatments may be used to prevent or retard darkening. One is to coat the fruit as it is cut with a solution of 1 teaspoon (3 g) crystalline ascorbic acid or 3,000 mg crushed vitamin C tablets per cup of water. Another is to drop the cut pieces in a solution of water and ascorbic acid, citric acid or lemon juice. Use 1 teaspoon (3,000 mg) ascorbic acid, 1 teaspoon citric acid or 3/4 cup lemon juice to 1 gallon water. the same amount of ascorbic acid works with 1 cup, or 1 gallon of water?

Waukesha County Wisconsin

3 Responses

It all seems very confusing. I found this at North Dakota State Extension:

Acidic Solutions

1. Ascorbic Acid Pretreatment: Pure crystals of ascorbic acid (vitamin C) can be found at supermarkets and drug stores. Stir 2½ tablespoons of pure ascorbic acid crystals into 1 quart of cold water. This amount of solution treats about 10 quarts of cut fruit. For smaller batches, adjust proportions accordingly. Soak the fruit for 10 minutes, then remove it with a slotted spoon, drain it well and dehydrate it.

2. Citric Acid Pretreatment: Citric acid is available in the canning section of many supermarkets. Stir 1 teaspoon of citric acid into 1 quart of cold water. Add the fruit and allow it to soak for 10 minutes, then remove it with a slotted spoon, drain it well and dehydrate it.

3. Lemon Juice Pretreatment: Mix equal parts of lemon juice and cold water. Add the fruit and allow it to soak for 10 minutes, then remove it with a slotted spoon, drain it well and dehydrate it.

The National Center for Home Food Preservation states this:

Follow these guidelines to ensure that your canned foods retain optimum colors and flavors during processing and storage:

  • Use only high-quality foods which are at the proper maturity and are free of diseases and bruises.
  • Use the hot-pack method, especially with acid foods to be processed in boiling water
  • Don't unnecessarily expose prepared foods to air. Can them as soon as possible.
  • While preparing a canner load of jars, keep peeled, halved, quartered, sliced, or diced apples, apricots, nectarines, peaches, and pears in a solution of 3 grams (3,000 milligrams) ascorbic acid to 1 gallon of cold water. This procedure is also useful in maintaining the natural color of mushrooms and potatoes, and for preventing stem-end discoloration in cherries and grapes. You can get ascorbic acid in several forms:

    Pure powdered form – seasonally available among canners' supplies in supermarkets. One level teaspoon of pure powder weighs about 3 grams. Use 1 teaspoon per gallon of water as a treatment solution.

    Vitamin C tablets – economical and available year-round in many stores. Buy 500-milligram tablets; crush and dissolve six tablets per gallon of water as a treatment solution.

    Commercially prepared mixes of ascorbic and citric acid – seasonally available among canners' supplies in supermarkets. Sometimes citric acid powder is sold in supermarkets, but it is less effective in controlling discoloration. If you choose to use these products, follow the manufacturer's directions.


I would follow the National Food Preservation site. It was just updated in 2017. Hope this helps!
Cindy


it doesn't. I was asking about freezing food, and you respond telling me to dehydrate or can it. can't see how the location I was asking about got removed from my question

anyway, I split the difference. used 3000 mg vit c tabs in 2 cups of water. no sugar. and so far, the apricots are still a nice bright "apricot" color . . .

I’m glad it worked out for you