Rose Disease

Asked June 6, 2019, 9:14 AM EDT

My tree expert has informed me that our old climbiing "Rambling rector" that climbs up the side of the house has scale and Rose Rosette. We are going to be taking it out. Can I plant a new rose bush in that same area? Can I treat the soil with anything? I have roses in a garden nearby but not in the same bed. Are they at risk? Would appreciate your counsel. thanks

Howard County Maryland

6 Responses

Rose rosette is a virus carried by a tiny mite. It is not in the soil. Yes, you can replant that spot with a rose. However, to minimize the number of disease-carrying mites still around that might infect the new rose, try to prevent them from falling off when you cut down the rose. (All roses are susceptible to rose rosette.)
One way to do this with a rose bush is to place the shrub in a plastic garbage bag, tighten the neck, and then cut the trunk. Modify this for a climber the best you can.

Also, remove any "wild" roses, i.e. rosa multiflora roses, in the area, which are hosts to tons of infected mites. They are also non-native invasives--so it's a win-win when you remove them.

Here's our rose rosette page for more tips: https://extension.umd.edu/hgic/topics/rose-rosette-shrub

Ellen

Just one more clarification : do I need to dig up the entire root system or just whats above ground. It's a 20 year old climbing rose and has an extensive root system. Thanks so much

Just one more clarification : do I need to dig up the entire root system or just whats above ground. It's a 20 year old climbing rose and has an extensive root system. Thanks so much

It is not necessary to remove the entire root system but dig out as much as you can.

Deb

Thanks again for the advice. We have since removed this old rose and now i'm a bit worried about another bush. It is not next to the one removed but in another garden bed at least 50 ft away. It did not produce the blooms i expected and the thorns on some of the canes are different and excessive. I have attached pictures of a few canes and new leaf growth. These were taken 10/3. As always, thanks for your expert counsel. Rosemary

Left photo - The thorns are normal. The black and dead tissue on the stem looks like a canker. You can prune back to healthy tissue next spring. Here is more on cankers https://extension.umd.edu/hgic/topics/cankers-vines
Middle and right photos - The red foliage is new growth and the thorns on the stem are normal.

Marian