Pest of Mature Pecan Tree

Asked March 13, 2019, 3:46 PM EDT

Any thoughts on possible pests for a mature pecan tree? We found what appear to be hundreds of cocoons just under the outter layer of bark in some sections (about 2-4 feet from the soil grade) the bark could be easily removed and appeared to have a whitish hue. I though maybe Euzophera semifuneralis, but we have not seen the borers, only signs. There are small borer holes in the bark indicating a borer is present.

District of Columbia County District of Columbia

2 Responses

It looks like there may be more than one type of borer. We see pinhole-sized holes and also a much larger one in the first photo which would be more like the size made by a plum tree borer, as you suggested. The white cocoons do suggest that.

If that area of wood is dead or decayed, it will attract borers, though they have not caused the original problem.

According to this link, the plum tree borer will not go after healthy trees: Euzophera semifuneralis,(p. 5).
Try to keep your tree healthy. You may want to have a certified arborist look at it. We recommend arborists certified by the International Society of Arboriculture (ISA). Many tree service companies have them on staff and they will often look at a tree for no charge, just charge for service rendered. You can find an arborist near you by following the prompts on the ISA website: www.treesaregood.org

ECN


It looks like there may be more than one type of borer. We see pinhole-sized holes and also a much larger one in the first photo which would be more like the size made by a plum tree borer, as you suggested. The white cocoons do suggest that.

If that area of wood is dead or decayed, it will attract borers, though they have not caused the original problem.

According to this link, the plum tree borer will not go after healthy trees: Euzophera semifuneralis,(p. 5).
Try to keep your tree healthy. You may want to have a certified arborist look at it. We recommend arborists certified by the International Society of Arboriculture (ISA). Many tree service companies have them on staff and they will often look at a tree for no charge, just charge for service rendered. You can find an arborist near you by following the prompts on the ISA website: www.treesaregood.org

ECN