Tired of killing plants not understanding their needs for their types

Asked February 10, 2019, 9:26 PM EST

Please, help me to find out what type of plant this is,;what's wrong with it, and what type medium is best for it. I'm tried of killing plants not understanding what their needs are. It's growing and dying at the same time. Such a gorgeous plant. I know they do not like direct sunlight so, I have it by a window where it gets morning sun filtered through a sheer curtain. It's been blooming so beautifully now it's getting dark spots on even baby New leaves. See pictures. Please, tell me plant is doing this just because it needs to be repotted as it is root bound and roots look healthy.

Montgomery County Pennsylvania houseplants anthurium

1 Response

Your plant is a anthurium. It is a tropical plant which is native to Columbia and Equador. The red, heart-shaped flower of the anthurium is really a spathe or a waxy, modified leaf flaring out from the base of a fleshy spike (spadix) where the tiny real flowers grow.

Anthuriums prefer bright indirect light and average temperatures of 65 -75 degrees F. They like average to high humidity. They should be potted in a mix of 1 part potting soil to 2 parts peat moss. Their roots should not be standing water or they will rot. A pot with a drainage hole is the best choice to use. The soil should to kept moist to the touch and not allowed to dry out. However, be careful not to overwater the plant. Make sure that the pot's saucer does not have standing water. Anthuriums are also sensitive to chlorine. If you are using tap water to water the plant, allow it to stand for at least 24 hours so that the chlorine will dissapate.

To increase humidity in the winter months when our furnaces are running, I suggest placing a larger saucer under the potted anthrurium's saucer. Keep the larger saucer filled with water to create a humid micro-climate for the plant, I suggest placing a larger saucer under the potted anthrurium's saucer. Keep the larger saucer filled with water to create a humid micro-climate for the plant.

Your anthurium appears to be suffering from exposure to chlorine. It is difficult for me to determine the condition of the rots from your photo but it appears that there may be some root rot present. I recommend repotting the plant in a slightly larger pot which has a drainage hole and removing any rotted roots from the plant.

Here's a link to an excellent source about caring for all sorts of houseplants
:http://extension.uga.edu/publications/detail.html?number=B1318&title=Growing%20Indoor%20Plants%2...

I hope that this information helps you save your plant!