We recently read an advertisement suggesting that bio-liquid calcium was more...

Asked February 3, 2019, 9:20 AM EST

We recently read an advertisement suggesting that bio-liquid calcium was more effective and more cost effective in raising the ph level than lime. In doing a little research, I don't get the impression that this is common practice (yet?), but as a small farming family we're always looking for new ways to improve our process. What are your thoughts on using liquid calcium instead of lime? Is it better/worse? More cost effective? A quick fix for a year that we weren't able to put lime out? Thank you!

Van Wert County Ohio

1 Response

The first part of the response is that Calcium (Ca) does not equal lime. The portion of lime that produces the pH adjustment is the carbonate (CO3-) not Ca. Calcium does have important functions in plant growth and development, but it has nothing to do with changing the pH of the soil.

Without seeing the label of the product in question, I cannot determine if it has any pH altering qualities.

The amount of any pH altering material applied to a field should always be based upon a soil test.

Here are 2 links to articles about "liquid calcium" products and soil pH with precautions about which products do what:

https://extension.udel.edu/weeklycropupdate/?p=7792

https://www.no-tillfarmer.com/articles/4575-beware-of-alternative-ag-lime-product-claims