Residential land use change for a daycare from a family residence

Asked November 27, 2018, 5:11 PM EST

Residential land use change for a daycare from a family residence: Hi, i have been notified of a planning commission hearing to change the residential land useage next door to me for a daycare that is for 7 to 11 children. my home is next door is family residential and the home up for change is now a family residential and the home on the other side of it is family residential. And their requesting to stay open hours 7:30am until 11pm ! Help! ? Both I and the neighbor ie both sides are against it; and so are two across the county road who were to far to be notified of hearing. We're in a very large block on zoning map of family residential zoning? can we stop it? Can we get a privacy fence put in if the pass it? Can i stop it?

Genesee County Michigan community planning and zoning daycare special use permit

1 Response

As a community planner, I have been involved in many permitting processes for child care homes. In my experience, it is important for neighbors to have a discussion with the person who will be managing the home about any concerns. This conversation will alleviate undue stress that comes from not knowing the full story or impact of the proposed childcare. If a conversation is not possible, you are invited to provide your comments to the Planning Commission. In permitting the childcare home, your local planning commission must refer to the Michigan Zoning Enabling Act, and must follow the regulations beginning on Page 5 of the Act in order to properly permit the new use. Here is the Act for your reference: http://www.legislature.mi.gov/(S(45jjsa453w5kfzbjw0yx3e45))/documents/mcl/pdf/mcl-act-110-of-2006.pd...
With that said, family or group childcare homes are allowed in any residentially zoned area according to the Michigan Zoning Enabling Act. A childcare home is typically granted a special use permit by the local unit of government, and under that permit the childcare operator must meet parking, signage, and other regulations that preserve the character of the neighborhood. This can include a review of the hours of operation too. "Stopping" the new childcare home is not an option if it operates according to the stipulations of its potential permit.