Best Evergreen trees for Howard County

Asked October 4, 2018, 4:20 PM EDT

1. We had a group of fir tree s(evergreen) (12) which kind of looked like the Itaiian pine trees, but were more fragile. We had to attach them to one another with a rubber covered chain so they woudn't fall over. This past year they fell over anyway. So we had them cut down. All of a sudden, we and our neighbors realized how close our houses were to one another and what privacy we both lost. So we want to plant trees (fast growing evergreens) that look like Italian pines in order to get our privacy back.. We want them to be much sturdier than the ones we had. Your advice is necessary and most appreciated. We want trees that are native to Maryland so we can be ecologically responsible. ALSO 2. Our house and trees are about 30 years old. We had 8 very tall( (20'?) pine trees which suffered due to the recent weather: rain, wind, drought and so we had 3 fall over and two more die. We cut down all but three - and I think they may be going soon. They are just inside our4-5' fence which backs on the street (Brampton Parkway) which carries a lot of traffic. What kind of tree would you suggest we plant there so we can enjoy them from our back windowns but which will give us some degree of privacy from the street.

Howard County Maryland evergreens plant selection arborvitae normal growth trees virginia cedar

2 Responses

You don't mention how tall you'd like the trees to be or whether you are growing them in sun or shade. At any rate, we always recommend a mix of species. Groupings of 3-5 of the same species are nice, and then having several different species actually improves the disease and pest resistance.

You may be happy with our native arborvitae or nothern white cedar (Thuja occidentalis). Also Virginia cedar (which is actually Juniperus virginiana.)
Bald cypress is always an exciting, bold addition.

Take a look at the tree section in"Ntive Plants for Wildlife Habitat and Conservaton Landscaping", which is online. It has photos of each plant, plus growing requirements such as sun or shade, in a good chart format.

ECN

You don't mention how tall you'd like the trees to be or whether you are growing them in sun or shade. At any rate, we always recommend a mix of species. Groupings of 3-5 of the same species are nice, and then having several different species actually improves the disease and pest resistance.

You may be happy with our native arborvitae or nothern white cedar (Thuja occidentalis). Also Virginia cedar (which is actually Juniperus virginiana.)
Bald cypress is always an exciting, bold addition.

Take a look at the tree section in"Ntive Plants for Wildlife Habitat and Conservaton Landscaping", which is online. It has photos of each plant, plus growing requirements such as sun or shade, in a good chart format.

ECN