Ivory halo dogwood

Asked May 30, 2018, 2:40 PM EDT

About 2-3 weeks ago I put this plant in my garden and it has been noticeably wilting. It gets really good sun (mostly morning) and I'm concerned that I put it in the wrong location. Also, I've I've been watering it everyday at the base for about 15-20 seconds, but am concerned that perhaps I haven't watered it enough. Any thoughts / recommendations would be very much appreciated!

Hennepin County Minnesota shrubs diagnosis of plant problems dogwoods ivory halo dogwood

1 Response

Thank you for the question. Ivory Halo dogwood is one of the tartarian dogwoods known for all season interest, and is especially wonderful in the winter with its red stems. Generally, this plant is quite tough and adaptable once established, to moist/dry, and full sun/part sun conditions. Your shrub is newly planted and won't be considered established for a full season or two so you are right in thinking about supplying extra water. You might be watering too little, too often. It's better to soak deeply about once per week, than just for a few seconds each day. The water needs to get all the way to the bottom of the rootball to encourage growth and this might not be happening. Of course, if you have clay soil that holds water, your shrub might be getting too much water! You will have to think about your watering habits depending on your soil type. Another problem could be the recent very hot weather. Many newly installed plants have suffered in the heat of last week. If this is the case and you water properly, the shrub should perk up.
Last, most new shrubs and trees fail due to improper planting. Please review our publication on how to do it, think about your planting procedure and decide if it was planted for success: https://www.extension.umn.edu/garden/yard-garden/trees-shrubs/planting-and-transplanting-trees-and-shrubs/ Most often, shrubs are planted too deep, or their dense root systems were not detangled and spread out, causing them to continue to grow in a circle, eventually choking off the flow of nutrients and water up to the plant.
Here's a good article about your type of dogwood:

Thank you for contacting Extension.