Cowitch in ivy

Asked May 14, 2018, 9:48 PM EDT

How do I get rid of cowitch taking over my English ivy, without hurting the ivy?

Durham County North Carolina

3 Responses

This question was answered by a Durham County Extension Master Gardener volunteer.

Thank you for your question

We would recommend, in order to protect the English ivy that you remove the cowitch (Mucuna pruriens ) by hand if possible as soon as possible before it blooms and then sets seeds, and if it already has seeds being very careful not to let any of its seeds germinate. If you can see seeds on the plants secure a plastic bag over them to prevent seed drop.

Please contact us if you need more information:

NC Cooperative Extension

Durham County Center

Durham County Master Gardener Volunteers

721 Foster Street

Durham, NC 27701

919-560-0528

Mastergardener@dconc.gov

Thank you for your guidance. I was very concerned over making physical contact with the cow witch
I understand it's poisonous. Thanks ,

Jeff

This is what I found on cowitch from NC State

https://plants.ces.ncsu.edu/plants/all/campsis-radicans/

Campsis radicans

This plant has poison characteristics. See below.

Common Name(s):

Cow-itch, Trumpet creeper, Trumpet vine

Cultivar(s):

Atropurpurea , Crimson Trumpet , Flava , Minor , Praecox , Spec, Atropurpurea , Crimson Trumpet , Flava , Minor , Praecox , Spec

Categories:

Native Plants, Poisonous Plants, Vines

Comment:

Climbs by aerial roots, but needs additional support; thrives on neglect- tolerant of wind, poor soil; spreads by underground runners and can become invasive; attracts hummingbirds; native; best flower production in full sun; flowers on new growth. This plant is mildly resistant to damage by deer

Description:

Woody, deciduous, or partly evergreen vine; leaves opposite, pinnately divided into 9-11 leaflets with toothed margins; flowers in clusters, tubular, orange-yellow to red; fruit an elongated slender capsule with many winged seeds

Height:

20-40 ft.

Flower:

Orange-red flowers, July to frost; best flower production in full sun; flowers on new growth

Zones:

4-9

Habit:

Deciduous

Texture:

Coarse

Exposure:

Sun to partial shade; range of soil types

Family:

Bignoniaceae

Origin:

USA, NC

Distribution:

Throughout

Poison Part:

Leaves, flowers.

Poison Delivery Mode:

Dermatitis, ingestion

Symptoms:

Skin irritation with redness and swelling

Toxic Principle:

Unidentified

Severity:

CAUSES ONLY LOW TOXICITY IF EATEN. SKIN IRRITATION MINOR OR LASTING ONLY FOR A FEW MINUTES.

Found in:

Forest or natural area in dry woods, roadsides, along fences; weedy in disturbed areas; landscape as woody, flowering vine

Growth Rate:

Rapid

Climbing Method:

Aerial roots but needs additional support

Tags:

apvg, showy flowers, deciduous, birds, hummingbirds, wildlife, deer resistant

From the information above; It looks as though there are poisonous parts of this plant please be careful when dealing with it.

Wear protective clothing.