Leyland Cypress Trees--Brown and appear to be dying

Asked May 11, 2018, 6:15 PM EDT

We've been gone for much of the winter... returning last week to find our Leyland Cypress trees in terrible shape. Two, we think, are probably gone. One.... a very important one.... appears in danger. The browning appears to be starting on the inside and spreading outward. In some cases, the very end of the branches are still green; brown closer to the bark. We didn't observe mites or any other insects.... but we sprayed the tree with an insect control. What can I do to save this/these beautiful treets.

Montgomery County Maryland

2 Responses


Leyland cypress are full sun plants. Some of this browning is due to too much shade.

Leyland cypress are marginally hardy in Maryland. Not only did we have very low temperatures this winter and thus a lot of winter damage on evergreens, but we also had a very dry fall which make damage worse. In addition, the long warm temperatures in the fall prevented many plants from going dormant and then the cold temperatures were very sudden.

All in all, not good for Leylands. Many Leylands look like yours this year. The dead growth will fall off and eventually new growth will cover it. Be sure to water if we have a drought this growing season--including droughts in spring or fall (until now, spring has been abnormally dry.)

Some of the inner browning is just old foliage that normally turns brown.

ECN


Leyland cypress are full sun plants. Some of this browning is due to too much shade.

Leyland cypress are marginally hardy in Maryland. Not only did we have very low temperatures this winter and thus a lot of winter damage on evergreens, but we also had a very dry fall which make damage worse. In addition, the long warm temperatures in the fall prevented many plants from going dormant and then the cold temperatures were very sudden.

All in all, not good for Leylands. Many Leylands look like yours this year. The dead growth will fall off and eventually new growth will cover it. Be sure to water if we have a drought this growing season--including droughts in spring or fall (until now, spring has been abnormally dry.)

Some of the inner browning is just old foliage that normally turns brown.

ECN