Bird Mites

Asked October 19, 2017, 5:56 AM EDT

With so many documented cases, how do your "experts" still claim that bird mites are host specifics? They are NOT. It's sites like this that spread misinformation and perpetuate the problem. I am so tired of reading these outdated, inaccurate opinions on websites like this. Bird mites do, in fact, live and feed off mammals, humans included. They do NOT die off after several weeks and they are NOT eliminated when the source (i.e. bird, nest, etc.) is removed. The ill-informed medical and pest control community are doing a great disservice to sufferers of bird mite infestations with their limited knowledge and inability to properly identify and treat this problem. While I wouldn't wish this torment on anyone, these "experts" would quickly change their tune if they were among the afflicted.

District of Columbia County District of Columbia

4 Responses

Thanks for sharing this information. Do you have a specific link or URL you are referring to? I so I can share this with the authors or contributors. Thanks!

For starters, please see the link below.
http://zootecnicainternational.com/featured/dermanyssus-gallinae-wider-concern-poultry-production/
Professor Olivier Sparagano has done extensive research on gamasoidosis. Please ask your experts to read his publications. There are also several documented cases of long-term infestations. Human blood was found in the mite populations and mite DNA was found in human excrement, further supporting the adaptive capabilities of these mites. If you truly want to help your readers/guests to this site, it may be be time to have all your experts review more current findings. Thank you.

Ask an Expert is a service of the United States Cooperative Extension Service. The link you provided has no affiliation with the Extension Service and all of the of the authors and contributors appear to be outside the US.

Why does it matter where the authors are from? Accurate information, scientific research, and documented findings are not specific to location. If you read the entire publication or, better yet, Sparagano's extensive research, you'd find plenty of documented cases in the United States. Is location now the criteria by which we decide fact?