tree plant ???

Asked October 9, 2017, 4:20 PM EDT

G'morning - Approx 4 years ago I planted a white dogwood out front, which regrettably turned out to be a very sunny area. The dogwood has not fared well secondary to the sun. a] First, I would like to find a street shade tree; preferably an Autumn Blaze Red Maple or Freeman Maple [would you have any recommendations as to which gardening center might have at this time in the autumn]; Basically a shade tree in the 40-50 ft height range. b] Second, Could I safely put a new tree in the same hole originally dug for the dogwood? Or would it be wiser and safer to have another hole dug for the new tree? c] I prefer to plant trees in the fall to give the roots time to start b4 spring arrives. d] Also, my son will transplant the dogwood into my backyard where it will hopefully get more shade from a columnar pear tree planted by my neighbor. Do you think the dogwood might survive the transplant this winter [which reads like it's going to be colder than last year but not bitter].. I am in plant zone 7; 21222. What are your opinions on the above questions. Your feedback will be appreciated. Thank you.

Baltimore County Maryland fall planting dogwood unhappy in sunny spot selection shade tree transplanting dogwood

1 Response

This is not the ideal time to transplant a dogwood, but if it is not too big and you can move it fairly intact so that it barely notices the move, it should be fine. With the severe drought we have been having, water the tree well a day or so before moving it. Also, a day or so before the move, dig the new planting hole, fill with water and let the water soak into the surrounding soil. You may want to do this more than once. Here is our webpage on planting trees (note planting time for several trees are included): https://extension.umd.edu/hgic/trees-and-shrubs/planting-process
Be sure to keep your dogwood well watered any time we have a drought. Do this for at least 2 years (more if necessary or it is competing with a lot of other tree roots.) Droughts occur in spring and fall as well as summer, as we are experiencing right now in Maryland.

ECN