Deformed plants

Asked August 17, 2017, 8:18 PM EDT

I have several different species of plants and even a tree in my yard that have deformed growth on the leaves. The top of Japanese lilac tree is deformed and several different hydrangeas as well a bloomerang lilac. It is most prominent in my hydrangeas. My climbing hydrangea is extremely effected as well as most of my annabelles. Wondering if you have any suggestions on how to treat.

Hennepin County Minnesota abiotic hydrangeas

4 Responses

If two or more species are showing symptoms a non biological cause is usually the agent. Deformed growth on several species at the same time usually indicates herbicide drift. The plant pictured in the upper left hand corner is showing distorted leaves, chlorosis and although it is not clear a white film on some of the leaves that maybe powdery mildew. Has a weed and feed product been used on the lawn? Did a neighbor treat their lawn? Another possible cause for the curling leaves in the 2nd and 3rd photos are aphids. Aphid feeding can cause leaf curl.
http://hydrangeaguide.com/common-hydrangea-pests-diseases/

Can you describe the damage to the tree lilac? Have you checked for Japanese beetles? Are the leaves full of holes and shriveling? Japanese beetle damage is very heavy and common this year.

The tree lilac, The damage is only at the top of the tree. It doesn't appear to be Japanese beetles. Though I have a rose bush that had signs of Japanese beetle I haven't actually seen one when I have looked for them. The tree doesn't have the holes that go along with the beetles.

As doe the herbacide drift drift I am sure most of my neighbors use a weed and feed as do we. I also use a spot weed treatment in my planters and have for years. Could this be the problem? Has it done irreversible damage to my plants and tree? Is there any thing I can do to correct the damage or will it heal itself?

If the plants aren't dead they will probably recover all on their own.
The Japanese Beetles are almost done for this year and the beetle is getting harder to spot. The best time to look is early in the morning in a sunny spot and usually high up on the plant. I hope your plants recover.