Maple tree has clumpsmof bugs, holes and bark damage. Also nandina question

Asked June 27, 2017, 3:05 PM EDT

Maple tree has multiple clumpsmof black bugs on it. THere are also holesin trunk and branches, and large damaged ares of bark. I also have nandina question. My yard has six nandinas. Once I remove, should I spray weed killer in hole? Where can I dispose of these tier 2 invasive? Thank you!

Montgomery County Maryland nandina holes in trunk damaged bark maple tree trees

8 Responses

Please send us photos of the maple tree so we can see what you are dealing with. Send photos of the whole tree, around the base, and holes in trunk and damaged bark.

Nandina - Place in plastic bags and throw in trash. See the attached link for plant development stage and guidelines. http://cipwg.uconn.edu/wp-content/uploads/sites/244/2014/01/InvasivePlantDisposal_2014-01-23.pdf
mh

Hello -
It's a magnolia tree- sorry, auto-correct.
Here are some photos. I also noticed their are a few white spider web-looking growths I tree.
Thank you for your help:)

Hello -
It's a magnolia tree- sorry, auto-correct.
Here are some photos. I also noticed their are a few white spider web-looking growths I tree.
Thank you for your help:)

We viewed your photos and overall the magnolia tree looks pretty good. We did not notice any insects in the photos.
The left photo shows a type of physical damage on the branches. The bark will heal on its own. No control is necessary.
Middle photo shows the root system of the tree and this looks normal. To prevent lawn mower damage It would be okay to lightly mulch (no more than an inch or two) and keep away from the base of the trunk. Keep the tree well watered during dry periods.
mh

Hi - thank you for getting back to me. My original post had pics of bugs and holes, which are all over bark. I'll include them here. Thanks!

Left photo looks like bark lice on the trunk. They are harmless and do not need to be controlled. Here is more information http://www.clemson.edu/extension/hgic/pests/plant_problems/hgic2365.html

Right photo - this looks like sapsucker damage. No control is necessary http://extension.umd.edu/hgic/woodpeckers-and-sapsuckers
mh



Well, that's certainly good news.
Thank you! Great service.