Serious English Ivy disease

Asked February 28, 2017, 10:19 AM EST

Our HOA has a huge bed of Ivy which is diseased. We are wondering if it is the soil or the plant. We had about 50 new plants added to,the bed last year. They now,have brown spots, as well. Can so,done there help us with a diagnosis before we proceed? Thanks

Montgomery County Maryland english ivy decline groundcover

1 Response

We would like to see digital photos of the groundcover that you are referring to. Send photos of the bed and affected foliage and attach to this reply. We are assuming you may be referring to English Ivy.

If so, here is some general information.
The ivy could have declined due to possible winter damage, poor site conditions, or fungal diseases. If the bed was neglected and filled with old debris like accumulated leaves, this can promote fungal diseases and the ivy can decline.
http://extension.umd.edu/hgic/bacterial-leaf-spot-and-bacterial-leaf-blight-english-ivy-groundcover

If you are referring to English Ivy, this vine is invasive and we do not recommend planting it. If planted near natural areas such as woods or parks it can grow and affect native plant habitat. If allowed to grow up trees it can produce flowers and berries which can be spread by birds. You also have the opportunity to remove the vines, and replant with another groundcover or low growing shrub. Matching the plant to the site - sun versus shade. https://www.nps.gov/plants/alien/fact/hehe1.htm

If you do not want to replant, then the bed needs to be maintained such as thinning the vines, pruning old foliage, remove fallen debris, leaves, etc. to promote good air circulation and light. This reduces the amount of moisture trapped and will promote faster drying of the planting bed.

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