sedum

Asked March 29, 2016, 1:26 PM EDT

Home Depot has 1' x 2' trays of densely matted sedum. Can I break that up into say 1" square pieces and plant on a sunny hillside? If so how far apart and how long will it take to grow and fill in? Thanks Jon Kavalauskas Silver Spring

Montgomery County Maryland flowers herbaceous perennials dividing perennials

6 Responses

It would help to know the specific species of sedum you are referring to. The cultivar, "autumn joy", will grow to 24" and should be spaced on 2' centers.


ro

No mention of species but attached are pics. Where does this stuff come from? I like it. Looks like from Mars but I guess not. Thanks.

This is a mixture of sedums or stone crop. they grow from 2" to 6' in height, they will spread between 12' to 18' This blend would be fine for a rock garden or planting between paving stones or as a border.They should do fine on a sunny hillside.


ro

Thanks. I would like to get maximum coverage. Attached is a pic of my hillside. Want to plant with perennial flowers and was hoping sedum would cover weeds in between. Is that feasible? Package suggested cutting into 5" squares and placing 5" apart like a checkerboard. Can I place further apart and expect it to fill in in a reasonable amount of time say like over the summer? Again where are they native to? Thanks.

Unless you give us the specific species and varieties in the mix, we cannot tell you the country of origin. Sedums grow all over the world.

The 5" squares spread 5" apart should fill in by the end of summer, but if you make it farther apart we can't really say (we don't know exactly what sedum you have). Some will probably grow much faster than others. Also, spread will depend on conditions, such as whether you water it during droughts. Don't get mulch on the sedum, which does not like to sit in moisture. Your hill should drain well and sedum likes soil well-drained.

Using sedum between perennials should be fine as long as the sedum does not get too shaded by tall perennials. Once again, there will be some variation in your sedum's tolerance of shade.

ECN

thanks for your help.