Limited mosquito spraying

Asked February 18, 2016, 9:47 AM EST

With Zika moving north inevitably, I'd like to be able to recommend a pesticide that targets mosquitoes or even aedes aegyptae more specifically without killing pollinators or damaging water bodies and animals. This is going to be a huge issue in the effort to limit pesticide use. Often enough people live close enough to each other that their efforts to limit mosquito breeding in their yards is insufficient as their neighbors are not so careful and so mosquitoes abound. I've done some internet searching and haven't found useful information about this specific issue.

Montgomery County Maryland mosquitoes pest control

5 Responses

The balance between pest control and environmental safety is an ongoing dilemma. The Zika virus will undoubtedly tip the balance in favor of more pesticide use and more damage to the ecosystem. As authorities determine the best course of action, recommendations will become available on our site and at the site of the Maryland Department of Agriculture Mosquito Control program. http://mda.maryland.gov/plants-pests/pages/mosquito_control.aspx vw

Argh. Bromide 30+30 is permethrin and piperonyl but oxide. As far as I know about this, the chemical is a typical flying insect killer (see Raid FIK etc). So its use, while a toxic but relatively quickly decomposing material, is very broad spectrum. So use in a vegetable garden as a fogger will kill many bugs and probably most pollinator insects. What a disconcerting recommended 'fix'.

The best approach to mosquitoes is as it has always been. https://extension.umd.edu/hgic/mosquitoes Get rid of standing water and use Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis to control larvae. The CDC also will keep Zika information available. http://www.cdc.gov/zika/index.html vw

I've asked Safe Grow Montgomery people, who forwarded the following article from Kenya, that talks about the relative failure and risk of pesticide resistance from spraying. http://www.theguardian.com/global-development-professionals-network/2016/feb/02/zika-spraying-pesticides-is-not-the-way-to-deal-with-epidemic-says-leading-entomologist

It does seem if you can control larval development it's safest and best. And BT can be applied more relatively selectively.