Water For Potatoes grown in Buckets

Asked August 10, 2015, 11:35 PM EDT

Hello! I've just planted my seed potatoes in a bucket (picture). My growing medium is 75 % coco coir with a mix of 25% vermicompost and I added 5 tablespoons of Jobes Organic Fertilizer for vegetables. All of us know about the high rate of moisture retention in coco coir medium. Right now, my medium is cool to touch and moist. Now I would like to know how much water should I give for my potatoes? And at what frequency? Should I flood them once a week to ensure that water reaches the bottom of the bucket? or Water them every alternate day? I live in a place where the temperature is between 85 F and 95 F with moderate sunlight.

Outside United States

3 Responses

We have several suggestions, but in the meantime, we found a publication from one of our sister organizations that describes a procedure for growing potatoes in a bucket. This may be helpful. When you open the publication, scroll down to page 3.
http://msucares.com/counties/jefferson_davis_33/201502-03_4-h.pdf
Note: it is extremely important that you drill holes in the bottom of the bucket for drainage!
LS

Thanks! The info was great.. Since am using coco coir medium, I need to know how much to water the soil without under watering or over watering. I use a water sprinkler of 5 litres. Please advice.

Regardless of the planting medium, the ambient temperature in your area will probably require daily watering. Again, make sure the container drains well, but don't let the soil totally dry out. Don't keep it wet, but keep it moist. Typically, plants that are in the soil would like to have one inch of rainwater each week, but that is difficult to approximate when container gardening. The best thing to do is to monitor your plants daily and water as needed. If the plants begin to wilt, it could be too much or too little water. Potatoes require a slightly acidic soil, so don't add anything that contains limestone. If the plants begin to turn slightly yellow, consider sprinkling in a tablespoon or so of iron sulphate or garden sulfur.
LS