I am a home beer brewer and recently planted hops (2013). They are now in the...

Asked August 2, 2015, 5:24 PM EDT

I am a home beer brewer and recently planted hops (2013). They are now in the 12-15 ft. height range but last year and this year I have been plagued by leaf browning and dying, not unlike downy or powdery mildew problems in grapes. I have not had any soil sampling done as this is such a small scale situation but may be interested in a commercial growing situation. Is there any info or handouts or spray bulletins available ? I know that a winery in Harpersfield in N.E. Ohio is now growing hops and I am pretty sure Tony Debevc is getting some info from OSU as to spray schedules and growing systems. Could someone please get back to me with some information, advice or references to help my situation. Thanks in advance Brian Donovan

Delaware County Ohio hops production

1 Response

Hi Brian

Sorry I was out of towen teaching all week just got your message..

Sounds like you have downy or alternaria blight, downy is mmuch different in hops than grapes. I would suggets you send a sample to Dr. Sally Miller in Wooster she will diagnose the disorder for you then we will be able to come up
with a solution for this year to reduce the spread and next year as a preventive.

Here is the form to fill out and submit with your sample,

http://www.oardc.ohio-state.edu/sallymiller/images/1Plant_sample_submission_form_2015_.pdf

Send samples for disease diagnosis to Sally Miller labs here is her contact and the sample submission instructions I suggest sending it first thig Monday AM and next day it, if you send today it will lay around the weekend and go bad. No cost for the diagnosis.

Sally A. Miller Professor

College of Food, Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Department of Plant Pathology

227 Selby Hall | 1680 Madison Ave. Wooster, OH 44691

330-263-3678 Office | 330-466-5249 Mobile | 330-263-3841 Fax

miller.769@osu.edu oardc.ohio-state.edu/sallymiller

General Guidelines for Collection, Preparation and Shipping of Plant

Samples for Disease Diagnosis OSU Vegetable Pathology Lab

Diagnostic Lab Contacts:

Dr. Sally A. Miller (330‐263‐3678; miller.769@osu.edu)

Please follow the instructions provided below to ensure that all tissue samples are received in good to excellent condition. We can’t accurately diagnose desiccated samples or samples in advanced states of decay.

To get the best possible results, follow these instruction. Collect and submit samples early in the day and week. Pack samples according to the instructions in the Packaging and Mailing section of this document.

> ü Collect samples representing a range of symptoms.

> ü Collect all parts of the plant that show symptoms. Don’t forget the roots!

> ü Collect specimens before chemicals are applied.

> ü Submit generous amounts of plant material. The more tissue we have the better chance we have of identifying the disease or disorder.

> ü Include Sample Submission Form in the package.

> ü Write “Live Plant Sample" on the outside of the envelope or box.

>

> Packaging and Mailing Samples

> A. Potted Samples:

> ü Moisten soil in pot and wrap pot well in a plastic bag. Enclose entire sample (pot and foliage) in a plastic bag. Seal bags to avoid loss of moisture. Do not use paper bags to wrap pots.

> ü For multiple pots or samples, provide sample-packing material so that plants do not topple or soil does not spill out.

> ü Samples from different plant species should be packaged separately.

> ü Label each sample clearly using a waterproof marker or pen.

> ü Include completed Sample Submission Form in the box.

> ü If possible, include ice blocks to keep sample cool.

> ü Write correct mailing address on the package.

> ü Ship samples overnight by priority mail. Do not send samples on Thursdays Fridays or the day before a statutory holiday.

B. Field Samples:

> ü Wrap roots in moistened paper towels.

> ü Place the roots, foliage or the entire plant in a plastic bag. If practical, seal bags to avoid loss of moisture. Do not use paper bags.

> ü Place fruit in a separate plastic bag. Do not add moisture to the sample.

> ü Label each sample clearly using a waterproof marker or pen.

> ü Include completed Sample Submission Form in the box.

> ü If possible, include ice blocks in the box to keep sample cool.

> ü Write correct mailing address on the package.

> ü Ship samples overnight by priority mail. Do not send samples on Thursdays Fridays or the day before a statutory holiday.

> ü Out‐of‐state samples must be accompanied by the appropriate PPQ526 permit for interstate movement. Contact Dr. Sally Miller at miller.769@osu.edu for the permit and diagnostic fees.

Once you get a diagnosis let me know and we can come up iwtha mamnagement plan for you.

Good luck!

Brad