Can bluebonnets go through two life cycles in one year?

Asked June 2, 2015, 10:39 PM EDT

With the wet, cool Winter/Spring we've had here in the Hill Country, the bluebonnets were spectacular this year! After I got abundant, mature seed pods, I mowed my wildflower area and then the Memorial Day rains hit. Now, seven days later, I have thousands of new bluebonnets sprouting where I mowed, and I have a lot of new blooms on plants that already went to seed a month ago but in an area that hasn't been mowed. Have you ever heard of a second sprouting of bluebonnets this late in the year (June)? Will the sprouts that are coming up survive a full life cycle in the Summer heat and make it to seed? Have you ever seen a second wave of blooms on a plant that went to seed a month earlier? If the sprouts that are coming up now are this Spring's seeds, and the sprouts don't make it to seed, does that mean that I won't have any new bluebonnets sprout this Fall? Have you gotten reports of this from elsewhere in Texas? Thanks! This crazy weather is doing some crazy things here in Blanco. Best, Brent

Blanco County Texas

3 Responses

Hello,

We normally see bluebonnet seeds that have fallen out of their bean pods germinate and grow, right after heavy rains in the spring.

The vast majority of these plantlets die off with the heat of the summer. A few will grow and bloom, but nothing like you see in the spring.

Don't worry, the vast majority of the seeds that still lay dormant in the soil should come up in October, over winter as a Rosette plant and bloom in the spring.

This is if all things are equal with well spread out rainfall, etc.

Sincerely,

David Rodriguez -Extension Horticulturist
Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service
Bexar County

Thanks for confirming that all is normal and that I should still have a good crop of sprouts come October. Brent

Don't worry, the vast majority of the seeds that still lay dormant in the soil should come up in October, over winter as a Rosette plant and bloom in the spring.

This is if all things are equal with well spread out rainfall, etc.

Sincerely,

David Rodriguez -Extension Horticulturist
Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service
Bexar County