How to get rid of "creeping Charlie"?

Asked August 27, 2014, 9:29 PM EDT

How to get rid of "creeping Charlie"?

Ramsey County Minnesota

1 Response

Creeping Charlie (Glechoma hederacea), also known as ground ivy and creeping jenny, is a perennial weed that is very difficult to control. It spreads by creeping stems and by seed. Creeping Charlie thrives in moist, shady spots such as under trees and along the north sides of buildings. Controlling this weed requires the correct chemicals and proper timing. The best post emergence control of ground ivy is achieved in the fall once temperatures have cooled to the 60's or 70's, with no rain forecast for 48 hours. This spray program may be repeated every ten to fourteen days as long as the weather is cooperative. Another time is during the short flowering period in mid-May. At these optimum timings, most active ingredient and combination products provide good control. The best choice for homeowners is a weed killer that contains triclopyr. A combination of 2,4-D, MCPP and dicamba may be used under some circumstances. The three together works more effectively than the combination of 2,4-D and MCPP alone but dicamba is absorbed through the roots as well as through leaves. Dicamba should not be used near the roots of your spruce trees or in your perennial bed. These chemicals should not be sprayed in your perennial garden, as broadleaf plants are susceptible to the herbicides. To prevent the ground ivy from creeping into the perennial bed from adjacent areas, maintain a plant-free area around the bed with the use a broad-spectrum herbicide (e.g., glyphosate). A plant-free area of at least 1 foot around the perennial should be adequate. Glyphosate can be carefully painted on the Creeping Charlie leaves in the perennial garden. Ground ivy that attempts to spread back into the planting can be destroyed in the plant-free area. In areas of a lawn with an extensive creeping Charlie infestation, it may be easier to use a broad-spectrum herbicide (e.g., glyphosate) to kill all of the vegetation in the area and then reseed the lawn. Increasing your mowing height to at least 3 inches can also slow the progression of the weed. You can find more information at the following sites. http://www.extension.umn.edu/garden/yard-garden/weeds/creeping-charlie/ https://hort.uwex.edu/articles/creeping-charlie