Is it possible to bottle plant vegetables like asparagus, broccoli, garlic,...

Asked July 12, 2014, 2:18 AM EDT

Is it possible to bottle plant vegetables like asparagus, broccoli, garlic, onions, zucchini, spinach indoor? I'd also like to grow like bell pepper, green beans, and cucumbers. I am willing to use grow lights, reflector walls, and gallon/liter bottles. I also have an Aerogarden, but I want to use that for other plants I know can grow in it. I live in an apartment so the space is VERY limited. Basically to my room where I have a huge North facing window. It's only for me so I don't need a much. Just a plant per vegetable. I'll decide later if I want more. Please help!

Orange County Florida indoor gardening growing herbs indoors tomatoes indoors microgardening

1 Response

Yes, you can grow vegetables indoors in container gardens, including plastic soda bottles. Some vegetables are better suited for this process, or “container-friendly”, than others. Here’s a list of container-friendly vegetables (and suggested varieties) to grow indoors:

Beans, snap (Bush 'Blue Lake', Bush 'Romano', 'Tender Crop')

Broccoli ('DeCicco', 'Green Comet')

Carrots ('Danvers Half Long', 'Short 'n Sweet', 'Tiny Sweet')

Cucumbers ('Patio Pik', 'Pot Luck', 'Spacemaster')

Eggplant ('Black Beauty', 'Ichiban', 'Slim Jim')

Lettuce ('Ruby', 'Salad Bowl')

Onions ('White Sweet Spanish', 'Yellow Sweet Spanish')

Peppers ('Cayenne', 'Long Red', 'Sweet Banana', 'Wonder', 'Yolo')

Radishes ('Cherry Belle', 'Icicle')

Tomatoes ('Early Girl', 'Patio', 'Small Fry', 'Sweet 100', 'Tiny Tim')

Here are a few tips:

  • Clay pots are usually more attractive than plastic ones, but plastic pots retain moisture better. For the best of both worlds, tuck your plastic bottle into a slightly larger clay pot.
  • Avoid small containers. They often can't store enough water to get through hot days.
  • Add about 1 inch of course gravel in the bottom of the container to improve drainage.
  • Vegetables that can be easily transplanted are best suited for containers. Transplants can be purchased from local nurseries or started at home.
  • Feed container plants at least twice a month with liquid fertilizer, following the instructions on the label.
  • An occasional application of fish emulsion or compost will add trace elements to container soil.
  • Place containers where they will receive maximum sunlight and good ventilation. Aim for a minimum of 5 hours of full sunlight.
  • Watering is critical. You may need to water daily or twice daily; in hot weather the soil can dry out quickly.
  • Watch for and control insects.

Good Luck !