Kelly said: HI, It appears that one of my unripe tomatoes is developing...

Asked June 26, 2014, 1:52 PM EDT

Kelly said: HI, It appears that one of my unripe tomatoes is developing blossom rot. I have a plot in a community garden. The soil is clay, but i planted my seedlings in an organic soil mix along with the clay. I have also tried to throw some crushed eggshells into the mix. Do you think the blossom rot is due to all of the rain? Last week we got four inches in one day and my garden was mud. Do I remove the tomato? Is there an organic product I can use to save my plant(s)? Thanks, Kelly

Ramsey County Minnesota

4 Responses

The blossom end rot is a symptom of the plants inability to take up calcium. Clay soil and excess fertilizer along with all this rain is a sure fire combination. There are fertilizers meant primarily for tomatoes which contain calcium. You could work that into the soil around the plant to see if that would help. You cannot control the rain but you can limit apply a lot of nitrogen. You might as well pick the tomato and dispose of it. Please visit our page on Blossom End Rot for more suggestions: http://blog.lib.umn.edu/efans/ygnews/2013/02/tomato-blossom-end-rot---facts.html

Do I need to limit or add more nitrogen? I mulched with grass clippings. Thanks so much.:-)

Do I need to limit or add more nitrogen? I mulched with grass clippings. Thanks so much.:-)

Limit the amount of nitrogen. You tomato needs calcium. Look for a fertilizer that is meant specifically for tomatoes that contain calcium as one of the main ingredients. I am aware of several different brands. Read the labels carefully.