Box Elder Beetle in fruit trees

Asked May 15, 2014, 1:06 AM EDT

I had fire blight in our dwarf fruit trees (pears, cherry, apricot) last year, cut the branches radically out and burned them, cleaning the knife between cuts, and sprayed the with baker's yeast solution into the cuts, and along the stems and braches. This spring they came out beautifully, until this week when I see them infestated with the beetles, and first signs of the blight. Is there a correlation?

Oregon insect issues pruning fruit trees

1 Response

You have some misinformation: Yeast is a micro-organism of its own and has no benefit for tree wounds. Trees make their own natural brier by waling off the area. Blight is a disease process often form a fungus or bacteria.
http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/xmlui/bitstream/handle/1957/46750/em8362.pdf
http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/xmlui/bitstream/handle/1957/46752/em8418.pdf
http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/xmlui/bitstream/handle/1957/46751/em8419.pdf
http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/xmlui/bitstream/handle/1957/46774/em8420.pdf

and here is more:

PNW Insect Management Handbook
Printed page URL: pnwhandbooks.org/insect/node/1583
Plum and prune-Lygus bug and stink bug
Photo of Western boxelder bug
Western boxelder bug
Leptocoris rubrolineatus Barber
Adult
Photo of Lygus bug
"Lygus" bug
Lygus unknown
Immature molting on host
Photo of lygus bug
"lygus" bug
Lygus unknown
Adult
Photo of lygus bug
"lygus" bug
Lygus unknown
Egg(s)
Photo of Western boxelder bug
Western boxelder bug
Leptocoris rubrolineatus Barber
Immature on host
Photo of Western boxelder bug
Western boxelder bug
Leptocoris rubrolineatus Barber
Egg(s) on host
Consperse stink bug (Euschistus conspersus) Western boxelder bug (Boisea rubrolineata)
Western tarnished plant bug (Lygus hesperus) and other Lygus spp.
Pest description and crop damage Adult stink bugs are all shield-shaped, with a triangle-shaped section in the middle of their backs. They are generally up to about 0.5"-0.6" long. The name stink bug refers to the strong odor the insects can emit if alarmed. The consperse stink bug is pale brown, yellow underneath with red antennae. The western boxelder bug is about 0.5" long and one-third as wide. Adults are mostly black and have three red lines on the pronotum of the thorax and several fine red lines on each wing. The wings lie flat on the bug's back when it is at rest. The abdomen is red. The young nymphs are bright red and when about half-grown become marked with black and begin to develop black wing pads. Adult lygus bugs are oval, about 0.19" long with a light yellow 'V' on the back. The bugs feed on developing leaves, flowers and fruit, which kills the tissue around the feeding site. They pierce fruit and cause "catfacing." Biology and life history Adults overwinter in groundcover. They feed early in the season on weeds and may move later into other host plants. Stink bug damage is worst in dry summers, when alternative hosts are dried up. Management-cultural control Eliminate weeds that serve as protection and early season food for the insect Management-chemical control: HOME USE
  • acetamiprid
  • azadirachtin (neem oil)-Some formulations are OMRI-listed for organic use.
  • carbaryl
  • esfenvalerate
  • gamma-cyhalothrin
  • imidacloprid
  • kaolin-Applied as a spray to leaves, stems, and fruit, it acts as a repellant to some insect pests. Some formulations are OMRI-listed for organic use.
  • pyrethrins (often as a mix with other ingredients)-Some formulations are OMRI-listed for organic use.
Management-chemical control: COMMERCIAL USE
  • esfenvalerate (Asana XL) at 2 to 5 fl oz/100 gal water (5 to 14 fl oz/a). PHI 14 days. REI 12 hr. Extremely toxic to fish and aquatic invertebrates; avoid spray drift and runoff to surface waters.
  • lambda-cyhalothrin (Warrior, Warrior II) at 0.02 to 0.04 lb ai/a. PHI 14 days. May disrupt beneficial mite populations. Extremely toxic to fish; avoid spray drift and surface runoff.
  • thiamethoxam (Actara) at 4.5 to 5.5 oz/a. PHI 14 days. REI 12 hr. Minimum interval between treatments 7 days. Actara is extremely toxic to bees exposed to direct treatment or residues. Do not apply Actara between the pre-bloom (swollen bud) and post-bloom (petal fall) growth stages. Do not exceed 11 oz /a per season.
  • thiamethoxam/chlorantraniliprole (Voliam Flexi) at 0.15 to 0.175 lb ai/a. Do not apply exceed 0.35 lb ai of Voliam Flexi per season. Do not apply by air. Minimum interval between applications is 10 days. PHI is 14 days.

Related Links

Hollingsworth, C.S. (Ed.). 2014. Pacific Northwest Insect Management Handbook.
© Oregon State University.

Use pesticides safely!

  • Wear protective clothing and safety devices as recommended on the label. Bathe or shower after each use.
  • Read the pesticide label—even if you’ve used the pesticide before. Follow closely the instructions on the label (and any other directions you have).
  • Be cautious when you apply pesticides. Know your legal responsibility as a pesticide applicator. You may be liable for injury or damage resulting from pesticide use.
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