Moving Raspberry Bushes

Asked September 2, 2013, 1:12 AM EDT

I recently found out that I will be moving away from the home I have had for 25 years; I have raspberries that were given to me by my mother, and they were given to her by my grandmother before I was born. These raspberries produce amazing large, plentiful and sweet berries and have thrived in my yard. I want to be able to take some of the plants with me to my new home. It is now early September. How would you suggest that I transplant the raspberries or preserve them until next spring? Is it too late to successfully transplant raspberries? Do I take the plants that came up and did not produce any fruit this year? Any particular things I need to do to the soil before I transplant them and any particular instructions to insure they root before the cold? I currently live in the Twin Cities and am moving to Wisconsin, so the growing climate should be the same. I would appreciate any help and advice to insure that I don't lose the one beautiful connection to my mother and grandmother.

Dakota County Minnesota

1 Response

Red raspberries perform best in garden soils that are amply supplied with organic matter and well drained. Remove all of the sod and weeds before you prepare the soil. Raspberries should be planted in a site that receives at least 6 to 8 hours of sunlight. Avoid planting raspberries within 300 feet of any wild blackberry or wild raspberry plant. Early spring planting is preferred over fall planting. Raspberries are best transplanted in spring before new growth breaks. They can also be transplanted this fall after they go dormant from frost. The crowns and roots of raspberry are perennial, but individual canes live two years. The canes produce fruit and die and so they should be pruned out. Red raspberries produce new canes from the base of the second year old canes and from buds produced on the roots. A mulch of straw or other appropriate material can be very helpful for weed control and soil moisture conservation in the raspberry plantings where soil drains well. http://www.extension.umn.edu/distribution/horticulture/DG1108.html http://urbanext.illinois.edu/raspberries/planting.cfm