a response to your answer of two months ago

Asked July 13, 2013, 9:52 PM EDT

yucca elata (I think)
I'm sorry to have delayed this so long, but soon after I received your answer, I noticed that the yucca that was the subject of my inquiry had started what looked like a blossom stalk. I have taken a series of photos of the plant as it sprouted four stalks, to record for my own edification. Because my e-mail carrier limits the amount of data I can transmit, I attach the first photo and the most recent two, from today. The first today was late morning; the second was later this afternoon - I include it because the main flower stalk now has fallen.
Somewhere, I think, I have a photo of the plant from a few years ago which, if I find it, I will send along for comparison.
The advice I received (essentially, "leave the plant alone") was right on the mark! [I note, happily, that I have an excuse, now, not to try to weed under it. The ends of the leaves are sharp, sharp, sharp!]
Thank you for your assistance.
A copy of my initial inquiry and the response from the Expert are included below. I will also respond to the evaluation survey.

W. Paul Wharton
436 East 800 South Street
Salt Lake City, Utah 84111
unlisted phone: 801-531-6735
wpwharton@juno.com
On Mon, 06 May 2013 09:26:23 +0000 aae-notify@extension.org writes:

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Here was my question and the answer is right below:

yucca elata

I think that is the yucca we have in our front yard near downtown Salt Lake City. It has been growing there for at least 35 years. It has bloomed each year for about 25 years. It stood about 12 or 15 feet tall, and flower stalks added another 8-10 feet. During February this year, it "fell over". The bottom of the trunk is still vertical, but it swoops over at about 7 feet up, reaches a low point, and then turns upward again. As far as I can tell, it does not look damaged, it is still green. And it did not have a heavy snow load. So what happened? And should I do anything to "rescue" it? If it would help, I now see from the bottom of this page, I could send a photograph of it as it now appears.
Given the time of day, I plan to retire for the night in a few minutes. Can you send a reply by email? Thank you!
Asked 3 months agoSalt Lake County Utah

Responses

It sounds like its own weight plus whatever snow might have been on it just caused the stem to bend. You'll know as growth starts this spring if the stem was damaged much. If not, it likely will settle into this new shape and keep growing. Good luck.

Salt Lake County Utah

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