tomato disease

Asked May 12, 2013, 2:48 PM EDT

Tomato leaves developing brown spots, then edges of leaves start curling up, then look dry and singed. Started with a couple of plants then spread to several others. See no worms or white flies or insects. These are plants started from seeds at home. What is the disease and how do I control this?

Polk County Oregon fruits and vegetables disease issues

5 Responses

Hello and thank you for asking about your tomatoes. Are you growing them outside already? The night temperatures are still quite low, and the leaf damage can look like disease or insect damage. This article from OSU extension gardening hints, "Enjoy the pleasures of home-grown tomatoes" http://extension.oregonstate.edu/gardening/enjoy-pleasures-home-grown-tomatoes Includes some basic information and links to excellent publications about growing tomatoes in the Willamette Valley.
If these are seedlings still being grown inside, give me information about their age, watering and fertilization practices and perhaps I can point you the right direction.

Thank you for responding. The tomato plants are all outside. 10 of them were put in the ground last week. They grew from seeds sown in the greenhouse the last week in February on heating pads and under grow lights. After developing 2 full sets of leaves they were transplanted to larger containers, then later transplanted to gallon pots. Mixture of sun golds, super sweet cherries, siletz, beefsteak, better boy, and brandywine (50 plants in all to give to family and friends yearly for past 12 years). This is the first time we've encountered this problem. Have isolated mostly super sweet cherries. Rest are showing some damage on lower leaves which are cut off and discarded. Is this a virus or fungus or ??? And will it spread to all the tomato plants (have decided not to give away any for fear that it's a disease that might infect other plants). Would welcome your thoughts. Thank you.


Hi:

If you can share a photo or two of the problem that would be helpful. Can you send photos to neil.bell@oregonstate.edu. Alternatively, if the plant, or plant parts, could be brought to the Extension office in Dallas that might help, too. Let me know what works best for you. Thanks!

Will try to take plant to Dallas extension office. What is their address? I don't live in Dallas. Do I have to make an appointment to see someone there?

Hi:

The address of the OSU extension office in Polk County us 289 East Ellendale Ave Suite 301-this is the building at the very south part of the parking lot. I will be in the office there on Tuesday and Wednesday of this coming week. Although I've not seen pictures, it is very early in the tomato season and as these are tropical plants and thrive on heat, it is common to see foliar stress, especially on older leaves.