psyllidae last year by millions on my screens and in wildow wells! Some came back alive this spring

Asked April 9, 2013, 9:39 AM EDT

I had millions of what I determined to be psyllidae on my screens, window wells, and grass, yard, and on my when I walked in yard, so many millions they would be on me and my guests when we go o our cars. (this was only last late summer/fall) They congregated in windows by millions on the north window, and less on other windows, They are VERY SMALL, grey and body shape is like that of cicada. Some markings on back. HARD TO SEE THEM. Not able to take photo. maybe 1/4" or less. I have no garden. Only trees are next door and are very old, maybe an elm, not sure type of tree. Please tell me what you know, or if you had influx last year, or if a tree could cause the millions (last year only) never seen the issue before in my entire life on window screens. Let me know anything you can about if there is an issue that would cause this as something had to cause them, and I know others had to be as perplexed as I, and had a hard time finding out what they are.

Hennepin County Minnesota insect issues

3 Responses

We'd have to see a specimen or sharp photos of the insect to identify it with certainty. However, based on your description, we believe the pests may be hackberry gall psyllids. If so, we guess that the trees you mention are hackberries.

For more information about the psyllids and ways to control them, go to the following website.
Hackberry Gall Psyllids
http://lancaster.unl.edu/pest/resources/hackberrypsyllids.shtml

Please note that while imidicloprid can be used to reduce psyllid numbers, its use has become controversial because some believe it poses a threat to honeybees and other beneficial insects.

Thank you, so now my question is, how do I get my sample specimens to you? I can't get a clear photo (too small)

Have you compared the specimens at your house to the photo and descriptions found at the University of Nebraska website? If what you see and read there fits the insects at your place, you can be confident you have hackberry psyllids and it isn't necessary to send any to an entomologist. Hackberry psyllids are a very common nuisance in Minnesota. Numbers vary from place to place and year to year.

Here is another website with reliable information about the psyllids:
http://www.entomology.umn.edu/cues/Web/144HackberryNipple.pdf

If you believe the insects are not psyllids, direct your question to the University of Minnesota Entomology Department: entodept@tc.umn.edu