Bat Bugs How to kill ,how long to die out ?

Asked March 13, 2013, 11:05 AM EDT

Hi,We have small bats in our ceiling and have blocked their entry and they found another entry point.Problem is i vacuumed the ceiling and their bugs have migrated to other areas around the house and yard.I have flea bombed the ceiling and inside house and put amourphous silica around the inside of house,on all skirtings,sills etc.I am working on blocking all other entry points then putting a one way bat door on the remaining entry.Question is how long will it take for bugs to die after being off host bats ?? Regards Sam East Coast of Australia

Outside United States wildlife damage management human-wildlife issues insect issues

1 Response

Sam, The bat bugs will live off the bats as long as they are present. Since bats migrate depending on temperature and food supplies, so to must the bat bugs forage for food when local colonies of bats are gone. Bat bugs can exist several months without eating but extended periods without food will cause an exodus which may or may not be random. One thing is for sure: bat bugs will readily find their way into homes and onto people.

Here is information from the Colorado State University Extension:
"Management of bat bugs requires focus on the roosting bats that are the original source of the insects. Removal or exclusion of the bats will prevent future infestations as the bat bugs will ultimately die-out in the absence of their bat hosts. However, in the immediate period after bat removal, problems may temporarily increase as existing bat bugs migrate in search of new hosts.


Any methods to seal off the area of bat roosting and the human living space is useful to prevent these migrations. Cracks and crevices used by migrating bat bugs can also be treated with insecticides, such as are used for bed bugs. If the area of the bat bug roost can be reached, use of an aerosol “bomb” or “pest-strip” may help kill bat bugs in those areas. The latter contain a persisting insecticide (dichlorvos) that can kill insects over a period of time."
Source: http://www.ext.colostate.edu/pubs/insect/05574.html