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(This group currently has 26 experts available to answer questions)

Questions asked to this group

Mesquite vs. Ironwood

This one is driving me nuts. I'm relatively new to the area, and was wondering how to distinguish an ironwood tree from a mesquite tree - any time of year. Thanks!

Arizona Posted about 1 month ago

Looking for information to sale White Oak Trees

I have several White Oak trees in my yard. I am looking to sell them. I talked to a friend that said a company came and purchased his red oak tree and his white oak trees, but he could not remember the name of the company. I read an article on this website about the pricing of trees. I have called local stores, however they did not have any information for me on the sale of the trees. I contacted DNR forestry and they said to try out of state timber mills or forestry companies. Any help would be appreciated.

Macomb County Michigan selling wood selling trees for lumber aabi cfei Posted about 1 month ago

Conifer tree disease

My conifer trees are dying from pine beetle i believe.My question is that the lower trunk of tree is sprouting new limbs.Does that mean they are trying to come back?Because if i have this right the inside is dead and fall and spring the new outside ring is the only live part. Thank You.

Herkimer County New York forestry Posted 2 months ago

Dead growing tip on Van den Akker weeping Alaska cedar

Hi - I live in Seattle and planted 3 trees in a row in my front yard in spring 2018: a weeping Cedrus libani 'Glauca pendula' and on each side of it a Cupressus nootkatensis 'Van den Akker'. The trees were already fairly tall (~15') and arrived bundled in canvas. They were planted as the nursery recommended: still in the canvas, but pulled away from the trunk and with the wire basket around the rootball removed. The local soil appears to be fairly rich and well drained. At planting, I added some compost and a small amount of fish bone meal to the holes. In spring of 2019 and 2020, I added a layer of compost (but no other fertilizer) around the base of each tree but away from the trunk, and added a ring of mulch to keep water from rushing off.

After a rough 2018 where it lost about half of its needles, the libani has rebounded and appears to be thriving. The rightmost Van den Akker also had a rough 2018 with a lot of yellowing foliage that mostly turned brown and died, but I think it is largely recovered, if not thriving. The drooping growing tip is still alive and green, though there aren't too many other branches along the uppermost 18"-24" of the tree.

The big issue is the leftmost Van den Akker. It also had a rough 2018 with a lot yellow foliage that that turned brown and eventually fell off. And in 2019 there was another bout of yellowing foliage that it seems never to have recovered from and culminated in the death of the growing tip and nearly the entire top ~24" of the tree. I am wondering with the growing tip dead, is that effectively like "topping" the tree where it will never quite grow right again? If you look at the picture of the top of the tree, there is one shoot of green in that upper portion, but everything else is brown.

Given that the other 2 trees planted at the same time and in very close proximity are doing OK to very well, it seems like the issue is likely not soil quality or something I did during planting. I think watering is the big question mark, and I never got a straight answer from the nursery whether I am under or over-watering. The first year I was watering at least every other day, and every day when it was hot. Last year, it was about every 2-3 days, and I have maintained that schedule this year as well. The soil never appears saturated even after generous watering (up to 4 gallons during very dry periods), and I also do not let it get very dry.

The tree doesn't look terrible other than the top 24" or so, but it also doesn't appear to be truly thriving either, at least based on other weeping Alaska cedars in the area. And of course, the deadwood at the top has me concerned about its long term prognosis. Wondering if there are good rules of thumb as far as how much and when to water (if different from what I'm currently doing), or perhaps the tree is lacking a key nutrient?

Pic 1: all 3 trees to show soil and proximity to each other
Pic 2: top of rightmost Van Den Akker showing a growing tip that is still green and alive
Pic 3: top of leftmost Van Dan Akker showing deadwood at top of tree including an apparently dead growing tip

Thank you,

John

King County Washington Posted 2 months ago

Excelsa western red cedar looks unhealthy

We planted 6 and one does not look quit right please help to figure out. If it has a fungus or something we do not want the other trees to die. We are at around 800 feet in elevation. First picture is a healthy tree bright green new growth. Second two are suspect tree.

Skamania County Washington Posted 4 months ago

Douglas Fir with Blueish Sap?

Several mature Douglas Firs in my neighbourhood (Central British Columbia) are weeping a distinctly Blue sap this spring? Never seen this before, we've had an odd late winter early spring as temperatures were +10C one and 2 weeks ago, now they are -10C (April 1)

Outside United States Posted 6 months ago

Tree Identification

I would like to identify this tree on our property. I love it but have heard that it may have shallow roots and it is close to the house. It has hanging extensions off each branch.

Putnam County New York Posted 6 months ago

Old petrified stump

What type of tree was this and is this worth any money?

Chesterfield County South Carolina forestry Posted 8 months ago

Our Doug for trees are raining down pitch on cars and decks. It’s Fall is this normal

We live on acreage with hundreds of Doug Fir trees and they all seem to be misting down pitch every day that constantly needs to be washed off of cars and skylights. It’s late November and I don’t ever remember this happening before in the fall. I’m hoping the trees are healthy. Is this a normal occurrence?

Placer County California forestry Posted 10 months ago

Using Trees to Capture Carbon question Number 577083

I have not received an answer to question 577083 of July 5, 2019, so i asked it again today, Nov 12,2019. That one is question number 606271. Please answer my question about which trees are the best for rapid carbon sequestration in the S Willamette Valley foothills?

Lane County Oregon Posted 10 months ago